Mon

06

May

2013

Getting the Right Paint Color

Finding the right paint color can be a really tough job. And I've had to learn this the hard way a few times. You see, when paint is on a swatch its color can be extremely deceiving. A tiny one inch swatch cannot tell you how the paint color will interact with the room nor can it tell you how it will compliment the furniture and accessories.

 

It's been said that the cheapest thing you can do to remodel and refresh your living space is applying paint; this may be true, however, I've had friends who have spent more than their fair share of money on dialing in the right paint colors due to the fact that they love the swatch but hate the feel of the room being that color.

 

My wife and I are in the process of starting a remodel right now and we're set to get the keys early this week. We've already been in the house a number of times with the realtor letting us in, and last week we brought along our interior designer to help us with the selections. She's been a great help guiding us through this process, and one of the things we discovered is that we are secretly in love with the very soft yellows.

My wife and I have narrowed our color search down to four colors by Dunn Edwards Paints:

 

Candle Light La Luna Cotton Puff Ice Glow
dunn edwards candle light paint swatch Dunn Edwards Cotton Puff swatch Dunn Edwards Cotton Puff swatch Dunn Edwards Ice Glow swatch

 

Secretly, between you and me, I can't see a big difference between these four colors (LOL), as they all look very light yellow to me and very similar. Perhaps its the subtle pigment changes in the mixing of these colors. That's why I'm planning on going down to Dunn Edwards to get 4, 1 quart bottles so we can paint a 4x4 square on the wall sampling these colors so we can make a choice.

 

Here's a video I found on YouTube which offers some great design advise!

 

Hope this will help everyone out who is looking for the right paint color to update their home. Remember that when choosing a paint color its important to observe those 4x4 squares at different times of the day to see how the light reacts with the room and furniture. Don't just pick one off the swatch, put it on the wall and observe it!

Until next time everyone!

 

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Wed

01

May

2013

Laminate vs Hardwoods

Wood Flooring vs Laminate Wood

 

One of the major factors I am considering is the hardwood vs laminate dilemma. Both materials have their definite pros and cons to consider before installing them in my new home. I'll go over my conclusions here shortly and include a images of both to check out.

 

Laminate flooring is definitely much more affordable than hardwoods. Being that it is constructed from wood pressed together at high temperatures it can be as much as 50% cheaper than their respective hardwood brethren. Also, due to the synthetic material they use in laminate woods, it is also much more durable than hardwoods. This means less possibility of scratches from the dogs running around in the house (which I have two!) and kids that can drop stuff and basically, just be kids.

 

Hardwoods on the other hand are truly beautiful and elegant. They can consist of all different types of woods and the prices can range from expensive to extraordinary expensive (think Madacassar Ebony at $150 per sq foot). Some of the more affordable and popular types of hardwoods consist of red oak, reclaimed wood which can add character and charm, Brazilian cherry, Oak, Maple, and Mahogany woods. My personal favorite are the cherry woods. I absolutely love the color, grain patterns, and the overall aesthetically pleasing qualities of this type of wood.

 

Also some honorable mentions for wood/laminate choices are of course the bamboo woods. Due to the fact that bamboo grows very quickly and is extremely resilient, bamboo is an extremely green product. Together with its easy maintenance requiring simple sweeping and vacuuming it makes for a beautiful and durable floor. However, bamboo does have some downsides. Being that bamboo grows in round stalks, in order for it to be made into planks it must be shaved and then glued together. And being that adhesives are being used to glue these planks together, this results in VOC (volatile organic compounds) to be released into the air. The amounts vary upon the types of resins used of course. Although bamboo looks like a beautiful product, I think considering this product will be relatively low on my list.

 

Here are a few flooring examples I found off of Houzz that I really like:

 

http://www.houzz.com/photos/922303/Pergo-traditional-entry-

 

This flooring is from Pergo and is called the Visconti Walnut Laminate Flooring. I really think the amount of detail in the grain is quite impressive for a synthetic product. Pergo claims this product is 30% more scratch protection and is easy to install. This will definitely be one of the choices I consider. I'll have to do more research and check back.

 

http://www.houzz.com/photos/2265604/Flowers-Kitchen-traditional-kitchen-boston

 

This kitchen has one of my favorite types of wood flooring: cherry. There is something that is so charming and quaint about solid cherry wood. It's dark rich color, its intricate grain patterns and overall look makes cherry one of my favorite types of flooring. I'll have to get a price quote for this product!

 

 

 

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Tue

30

Apr

2013

Remodeling my Home

Hello everyone, I am writing this blog to document my journey into the remodel of my property. I've had my house for quite sometime; however, the time has come for me to embark on the journey of doing a remodel.

 

Doing a remodel can be quite stressful so I recommend taking your time to plan out the most necessary things to work on first. What I did was make a list going room by room and coming up with the necessities. This list helped me feel much more organized, and when I sat down to look at all of the items that needed to be updated I was able to come up with a step by step plan.

 

The first item on my remodel list is my kitchen. The cabinets are old and are in much need of refinishing or replacing. What I plan on doing is getting some price quotes for different types of cabinets. From reading HGTV's cabinet choices they brought up some very pertinent information. They state that the most expensive part of the cabinet is the doors and drawer fronts and that up to 70% of the costs is indeed the door fronts. I honestly had no idea!

 

Although I have a firm budget, I am open to the possibility of exploring new cabinetry. When looking for new cabinets it opens the world to a lot of new design and layout possibilities. The house has a country layout, so hard edged contemporary is definitely not something I am interested in. I'd like to find designs that would complement the inherent design of the structure while bringing up to date the look.

 

When looking for cabinet designs I will have to decide whether or not to get stock cabinetry (per-constructed cabinets) or having the cabinets made custom. Obviously, going the custom route means that they will be absolutely unique and fitted especially to the home, which is something I like. However, the down side would be the price. Stock cabinetry will be much more affordable due to the mass production process.

 

Choosing the right countertop.

 

When looking for the right countertop I am trying to decide which would be the best material to use. I will list the pros and cons of each material.

 

Natural Stone: I love the look and beauty of the natural stone. It's brilliance and uniqueness are key factors in making this so attractive to me. Granite and marble are two of the most popular types of material used for countertops; however, I have also read that limestone and soapstone are also used. I have yet to see any of those materials in stores though. Usually its only granite and marble.

 

Quartz-stone: Quartz is a partially man made as in quartz does not naturally come in slabs. Quartz is first mined as crystals and then ground into smaller more uniform pieces and particles. The finer the particles are ground down the more uniform the colors and designs will be in the final product. Resins are then added to the product and compressed together and then placed in an oven. After this I done the slab has been created with the desired color, texture and size.

 

Wood slabs: I've seen kitchens using butcher block countertops which I think is a very interesting type of material. Although it might add a lot of character to a kitchen I'm not sure if I want it in mine though. Bacteria and other germs can get into the wood and contaminate food product if not cleaned correctly.

 

 

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